Mets fall in SD, despite Thor's 10 hammers

Mets fall in SD, despite Thor's 10 hammers

SAN DIEGO -- Will Venable, Derek Norris and Alexi Amarista each knocked in two runs, and Ian Kennedy won for the first time in nearly a month as the Padres defeated the Mets, 7-2, at Petco Park.

Norris hit a two-run home run -- his fifth of the season -- off Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard (2-3). Syndergaard allowed seven runs on 10 hits and 10 strikeouts in four innings.

After San Diego's Andrew Cashner became the first pitcher in the modern era to strike out 10 or more and allow 10 or more hits in fewer than five innings on Monday, Syndergaard then did the same on Tuesday.

Kennedy (3-6), who won for the first time since May 6, allowed a run in the first inning and then settled down. He allowed two runs on six hits with two walks and eight strikeouts.

"He's always been tough on us," Mets manager Terry Collins said. "You look at his numbers against the Mets over his career, he's been tough. We just never get him squared up very good." More >

Kennedy fans eight to earn win

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Welcome back: Padres first baseman Yonder Alonso, playing in his first game since May 7, had three hits and scored two runs against the Mets. Alonso missed 23 games with a right shoulder bruise. Heck, he even made a nice leaping catch of a Lucas Duda line drive to start the sixth inning, saving an extra-base hit.

"I just want to make sure I do my part and enjoy it and compete," Alonso said. More >

Alonso's leadoff single

Bountiful bottom of the order: The Padres got some much-needed production from their bottom of their order Tuesday. First, Amarista, the No. 8 hitter, drove in two runs with a single off Syndergaard's glove in the second inning. In the third inning, No. 7 hitter, Cory Spangenberg had an RBI triple to make it 5-1.

Amarista's two-run single

If all else fails, try Cuddyer: About the only Mets hitter happy to face Kennedy was Michael Cuddyer, who scored on a Wilmer Flores RBI single shortly after doubling with two outs in the sixth. That was the third hit of the night for Cuddyer, who extended his hitting streak to eight games.

Cuddyer's RBI single

QUOTABLE
"Once he got through that first inning, had a good second inning, you could see his confidence build with all his pitches." -- Padres manager Bud Black on Kennedy

SOUND SMART WITH YOUR FRIENDS
In Major League history only 334 pitchers had ever allowed 10 or more hits with 10 or more strikeouts in in a game. On Monday, Cashner became the first ever to do so in just five innings, striking out 12 and allowing 11 hits in 4 2/3 innings. On Tuesday, Syndergaard matched him. Go figure! More >

Syndergaard's 10 K's

HOME SWEET HOME
After Tuesday's win, the Padres own an all-time 25-14 (.641 winning percentage) record against the Mets at Petco Park since they moved into their downtown ballpark in 2004. That rates as San Diego's best home winning percentage against a National League opponent in that time.

Venable's two-run triple

REPLAY REVIEW
Black successfully used his manager's challenge to get a call overturned in the third inning, as Spangenberg was originally called out at third base attempting to stretch a double into a triple. Following a short review, the call was overturned.

Spangenberg's RBI triple

WHAT'S NEXT
Mets: Dillon Gee (0-2, 3.86) will come off the disabled list to start Wednesday's series finale against the Padres at Petco Park. Gee, whose presence prompted the Mets to switch to a six-man rotation, has not started a game since May 3. He is 1-1 with a 3.86 career ERA in San Diego.

Padres: The Padres send their ace, James Shields (6-0, 3.69), to the mound on Wednesday in the series finale against the Mets at 6:10 p.m. Shields has been everything the Padres have wanted and asked for in his first season with the club. And for a team that often struggled to score runs, they are averaging 6.98 runs per game when Shields starts.

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Corey Brock and Anthony DiComo are reporters for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.